Guardian

The closest you're ever gonna get to a Bond girl.

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Just recovering

Hey Jess, I’ve just been recovering from that last trip. I’ve been so tired lately and I don’t know why. It’s like my energy is sapped.

Anyway that’s really all there is to say at the moment. Got any questions?

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Anonymous asked: A stranger greets you. What do you do?

Generally when I meet a new person I look them over pretty carefully. I’m wary and watchful first and then gradually lighten up depending on the interaction.

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Anonymous asked: I can't find my keys. Do you know where they are?

Sadly I’d have to say no. I’m sure you can go and get a spare made at your dealership and relock all your doors. Or you could just keep looking. Best i got.

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Ok so that took a little longer….

Wow Jess. Sorry. That took a little longer then expected. I know I probably should have just called you up but you have no idea what a pain this client was. Not only did I get to go shopping at the crappiest stores with the most hideous cloths I’ve seen but I got to sit at lunch with Mummfy and Bummfy talking shit about all their friends. So much fun…let me tell you. This socialite barely came up for air before having another thing she wanted to run off and do. I sure that’s party why her father hired me right?

Anyway…tell me what’s been going on with you. What have I missed? I see some people are leaving questions. Are you one of them? It’s actually really kinda cool to get them. So I guess I’ll go answer a few now.

Love ya

Rea

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Just long enough

Jess I’m jumping on long enough to tell you I haven’t disappeared. I’m out on a job and I should be back no later then Saturday. I hope that you have a happy Thanksgiving. 

What do you guys do for thanksgiving? I’m assuming all the sisters and nuns get together and make food to share with everyone like the rest of us? I know that’s a really bad questions but I’m blunt and you know that about me too.

Anyway, love you sis.

Reagan

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history-and-shit:

The Greeks call him “Μέγας Ἀλέξανδρος,” that is, “Alexander the Great,” and he truly remains so, because he fought a total of 17 major battles, and won every single one of them. He was severely outnumbered in most of them, but by his generalship his men never lost more than 16% of their army in any one battle. That 16% death rate occurred only once, at Issus, in 333 BC, at which battle Alexander lost 6500 to 7000 men out of 40,000. His enemy, Darius III of Persia, lost 20,000 to 30,000 dead.
At Gaugamela, two years after Issus, he lost only 2.5% of his army, or about 1,100 men dead out of 47,000. He defeated the Persians spectacularly and his men killed at least 40,000, and as many as 90,000. The Persian army was comprised of at least 100,000 men, and may have had as many as 1,000,000. Darius was finally able to use his entire army at once without terrain restrictions, since at Issus Alexander fought him in a fairly narrow mountain pass.
Alexander surveyed the Persian army the night before, and decided to shift his army to the Persian left. Darius could not force his entire army to displace because the logistics were impossible. He did not want to present Alexander with his left flank, so he lengthened his lines, covering more ground with the same men, thus thinning their lines considerably. This had the effect Alexander wanted: his breakthrough on the Persian left was easier to achieve, and with his extraordinarily well trained cavalry (the Companions), he flanked the Persians, nearly speared Darius himself, and caused the Persians to panic and flee.
This was his typical strategy on the field, and it required his own left flank to be unbelievably tough, since the enemy army charged full force into it and attempted to flank it. Unfortunately for his enemies, you simply cannot break a Greek phalanx in the front. It is designed to withstand such assaults, and Alexander’s primary captain, Parmenion, deserves a lot of the glory for maintaining the army’s formation throughout all Alexander’s battles. Horses are very intelligent animals and will not charge into a line of spear points, however vehemently they are made to run.
Darius solved this problem by blindfolding his horses and harnessing them to chariots with sword blades attached to the wheel hubs. These would cut men’s legs off at the shins. Alexander solved this problem by training his men to separate their phalanges to half their depth, allow the horses and chariots into a three-sided pocket, kneel with their shields to the ground, and then swarm onto the charioteers. The scythed wheels rattled harmlessly across the shields. Today this tactic is called “Alexander’s Mousetrap.”

Have to love a man who knows how to beat his enemy.

history-and-shit:

The Greeks call him “Μέγας Ἀλέξανδρος,” that is, “Alexander the Great,” and he truly remains so, because he fought a total of 17 major battles, and won every single one of them. He was severely outnumbered in most of them, but by his generalship his men never lost more than 16% of their army in any one battle. That 16% death rate occurred only once, at Issus, in 333 BC, at which battle Alexander lost 6500 to 7000 men out of 40,000. His enemy, Darius III of Persia, lost 20,000 to 30,000 dead.

At Gaugamela, two years after Issus, he lost only 2.5% of his army, or about 1,100 men dead out of 47,000. He defeated the Persians spectacularly and his men killed at least 40,000, and as many as 90,000. The Persian army was comprised of at least 100,000 men, and may have had as many as 1,000,000. Darius was finally able to use his entire army at once without terrain restrictions, since at Issus Alexander fought him in a fairly narrow mountain pass.

Alexander surveyed the Persian army the night before, and decided to shift his army to the Persian left. Darius could not force his entire army to displace because the logistics were impossible. He did not want to present Alexander with his left flank, so he lengthened his lines, covering more ground with the same men, thus thinning their lines considerably. This had the effect Alexander wanted: his breakthrough on the Persian left was easier to achieve, and with his extraordinarily well trained cavalry (the Companions), he flanked the Persians, nearly speared Darius himself, and caused the Persians to panic and flee.

This was his typical strategy on the field, and it required his own left flank to be unbelievably tough, since the enemy army charged full force into it and attempted to flank it. Unfortunately for his enemies, you simply cannot break a Greek phalanx in the front. It is designed to withstand such assaults, and Alexander’s primary captain, Parmenion, deserves a lot of the glory for maintaining the army’s formation throughout all Alexander’s battles. Horses are very intelligent animals and will not charge into a line of spear points, however vehemently they are made to run.

Darius solved this problem by blindfolding his horses and harnessing them to chariots with sword blades attached to the wheel hubs. These would cut men’s legs off at the shins. Alexander solved this problem by training his men to separate their phalanges to half their depth, allow the horses and chariots into a three-sided pocket, kneel with their shields to the ground, and then swarm onto the charioteers. The scythed wheels rattled harmlessly across the shields. Today this tactic is called “Alexander’s Mousetrap.”

Have to love a man who knows how to beat his enemy.

(Source: history-and-shit)

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I need to follow more blogs!

mydarklord:

If you post/reblog any of this things, reblog or like this post so that I can follow you!

  • Doctor Who
  • David Tennant
  • Matt Smith
  • John Barrowman
  • Supernatural
  • Jensen Ackles
  • Jared Padalecki
  • Sherlock Holmes
  • Benedict Cumberbatch
  • Tom Hiddleston
  • Death Note

I sometimes repost things about Supernatural or Dean…if that counts.

(via thereignofdaenerys)

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Anonymous asked: On a cold winter's night what is your favorite thing to curl up with?

Oh you knew the answer to this one didn’t you? Automatic answer is Dean. Supernatural episodes on Bluray. If not, then my kitty Dean and a video game now and then (first person shooter).